Tag Archives: romance

Famous Love Letters: Romantic and Erotic

Famous Love Letters: Romantic and Erotic

I’m a sucker for a great romance. Just last night, I sighed when married Olympic Skating couple, Alexa Scimeca Knierim and Chris Knierim kissed at the end of their short program. I rewatch romantic scenes from TV and movies, or reread them in books. And of course, I like to write swoonworthy romantic scenes.

On Valentine’s Day, thoughts of love and devotion are expressed through gifts and a card or letter. Today, with email and text being the most common form of written expression, Valentine’s Day might be the only time people receive handwritten notes from an admirer. To get into the spirit of putting your emotions on paper, I thought I’d share excerpts of famous love letters.

My favorite love letter of all time is from fiction. It’s the letter Captain Wentworth writes to Anne Elliot in Jane Austen’s Persuasion.

I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it, eight years and a half ago. Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you. Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this? Can you fail to have understood my wishes? I had not waited even these ten days, could I have read your feelings, as I think you must have penetrated mine. I can hardly write. I am every instant hearing something which overpowers me. You sink your voice, but I can distinguish the tones of that voice when they would be lost on others. Too good, too excellent creature! You do us justice, indeed. You do believe that there is true attachment and constancy among men. Believe it to be most fervent, most undeviating, in F. W.

“I must go, uncertain of my fate; but I shall return hither, or follow your party, as soon as possible. A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father’s house this evening or never.”

Swoon!

However, you don’t have to look to literature for love letters. Throughout history, men and women have been writing love letters.  What’s more, because writing was so different, even just 50 years ago, real-life love letters have a beauty and depth that I’m not sure will be found when today’s love letters are viewed upon in the future.

But even with the beautiful language, many love letters of yore have an erotic element. Below are a few real-life love letters. The first section includes letters of deep love and devotion. Below that are a few filled with desire and lust.

Beethoven to his Immortal Beloved

Though still in bed, my thoughts go out to you, my Immortal Beloved, Be calm – love me – today –yesterday – what tearful longings for you – you – you – my life – my all–farewell. Oh continue to love me – never misjudge the most faithful heart of your beloved. Ever thine. Ever mine. Ever ours.’

John Keats to Franny Brawne

My love has made me selfish. I cannot exist without you – I am forgetful of every thing but seeing you again – my Life seems to stop there – I see no further. You have absorb’d me…I would be martyr’d for my Religion – Love is my religion – I could die for that – I could die for you…

Elizabeth Barrett Browning to Robert Browning

And now listen to me in turn. You have touched me more profoundly than I thought even you could have touched me — my heart was full when you came here today. Henceforward I am yours for everything….

Johnny Cash to June Carter Cash

You still fascinate and inspire me. You influence me for the better. You’re the object of my desire, the #1 Earthly reason for my existence.’

Nathaniel Hawthorn to Sophie Peabody

But if I am worthy of it you will always love me; and if there be anything good and pure in me, it will be proved by my always loving you.

Abigail Adams to John Adams

…should I draw you the picture of my heart it would be what I hope you would still love though it contained nothing new. The early possession you obtained there, and the absolute power you have obtained over it, leaves not the smallest space unoccupied.

Here’s a few that might make you blush…

Napoleon writing to Josephine (Archive.org has a manuscript of Napoleon’s love letters)

I am going to bed with my heart full of your adorable image… I cannot wait to give you proofs of my ardent love… How happy I would be if I could assist you at your undressing, the little firm white breast, the adorable face, the hair tied up in a scarf a la creole. You know that I will never forget the little visits, you know, the little black forest… I kiss it a thousand times and wait impatiently for the moment I will be in it. To live within Josephine is to live in the Elysian fields. Kisses on your mouth, your eyes, your breast, everywhere, everywhere.

Arthur Miller to Marilyn Monroe

“I will kiss you and hold you close to me and sensational things will then happen. All sorts of slides, rollings, pitchings, rambunctiousness of every kind. And then I will sigh. And when you rest your head on my shoulder, then slowly I will get HUNGRY. I will come again to the kitchen, pretending you are not there and discover you again. And as you stand there cooking breakfast, I will kiss your neck and your back and the sweet cantaloupes of your rump and the backs of your knees and turn you about and kiss your breasts and the eggs will burn.” 

Gustav Flaubert to Louise Colet

“I will cover you with love when next I see you, with caresses, with ecstasy. I want to gorge yu [sic] with all the joys of the flesh, so that you faint and die. I want you to be amazed by me, and to confess to yourself that you had never even dreamed of such transports… When you are old, I want you to recall those few hours, I want your dry bones to quiver with joy when you think of them.”

Warren G. Harding to Carrie Fulton Phillips (note that Jerry was the pet name for his penis)

“Wish I could take you to Mount Jerry. Wonderful spot.”

Laurence Olivia to Vivien Leigh

“I woke up absolutely raging with desire for you my love … Oh dear God how I did want you. Perhaps you were stroking your darling self.”

And another…

“I am sitting naked with just my parts wrapped in your panties. My longing for you is so intense…I’m loving and adoring and want you so.”

James Joyce uses some choice erotic words that I don’t feel comfortable re-posting. If you like that sort of thing, do a search on it.

Do you think writing love letters (or regular letters for that matter) is a lost art? Have you written or do you write your thoughts of love and devotion to the person you admire?

True Love and Tragedy

Jenna Harte

I perused a couple of “great romantic couples” lists, and found, to my surprise, that nearly all them featured romances that ended tragically. However, when I did a poll about favorite romantic couples the only tragic couples on the list were Scarlett and Rhett (3.5% vote … and who I think probably did ultimately end up together even without the sequel), and Romeo and Juliet, who didn’t get a single vote.

That got me thinking:

 

What makes a great enduring love story?

You can check out the lists here:
Top 20 Most Famous Love Stories in History and Literature
Classic Romance Novels Worth Reading

What do you think makes a great love story?

Worth the Risk is FREE at Your Favorite Ebook Store

Who doesn’t like free ebooks? Especially if you don’t know the author. I’ve given free and low-low cost ebooks out for some time as a way to introduce myself to readers or as a gift to my email subscribers and SweetHarte street team.

Now, I’ve made one of those books available for free at the top ebook retailers.

In Worth the Risk, Max and Madeleine meet, but it’s not love at first sight.

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There isn’t a woman in the world who wouldn’t want to get up close and personal with sexy, self-made millionaire bachelor, Max Delecoeur, except Madeleine Hainsworth. Madeleine knows all about men like Max; rich, arrogant and willing to do anything and hurt anyone to achieve profits.

Max is initially intrigued by Madeleine’s disdain of him, until she accuses him of business practices that involve child labor. He demands Madeleine show him her proof and then enlists her as a guide to the silica mines of Nigeria.

Together they put their lives in danger as they trek through the jungle to expose child labor abuse, but as attraction and respect draw them together, will a chance at love be worth the risk?

Worth the Risk is free at Amazon, Nook, iBooks and Kobo! Grab your free copy now.

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If you like getting free ebooks and other cool stuff, consider signing up for my email subscribers and/or joining the SweetHarte street team.

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A Second Chance at a Love that was Meant to Be

Meant to Be

I love second chance love stories. My all time favorite is Persuasion, by Jane Austen. I’m not sure why I’m so drawn to them, except I love the idea of a soulmate, and that even problems and time can’t prevent that love from existing.

On September 27, 2016, my homage to second chance at love hits bookstores. It tells the story of Mitch McKenna (Lexie’s brother from Drawn to Her) and Sydney Preston, who in college thought they had their lives all planned out, but it all came apart. Ten years later, they meet again, and while the attraction and longing is there, Mitch isn’t about to let his heart be broken again.

Stay tuned for excerpts, advanced reviews, and launch day plans that will include fun and freebies!

Meant to Be: Southern Heat Book Two

Meant to Be, by Jenna HarteCharming and sexy, detective Mitch McKenna lets women into his bed—not into his heart. When his first love left him in a lurch, crushing his soul, Mitch swore off relationships and love. After all, any woman who chooses what her parents want over what she wants is not worth fighting for.

Or is she?

Successful New York doctor, Sydney Preston left the only man she ever loved to follow the path that her parents paved for her. When a tragic incident at the hospital threatens her life, Sydney moves to Virginia to rekindle the spark with her ex-fiancé.

But Mitch isn’t interested in reigniting the flame that fizzled out long ago. Will they both allow resentments and misunderstanding spoil their chance of discovering what was meant to be?

Meant to Be is available for pre-order at all your favorite online retailers:

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Haven’t read Drawn to Her: Southern Heat Book One?

You don’t have to read Drawn to Her in order to follow Meant to Be, but you’ll be introduced to all the characters, and enjoy a fun, southern romance if you do. Learn more and read an excerpt of Drawn to Her.

Writing Great Love Scenes

Writing Love Scenes

I’ll be on a romance writing panel with fellow authors Ellen Butler and Kelly Eadon at the Virginia Writers Club annual symposium. While romance doesn’t get much respect in the writing field, it’s the most popular genre fiction. Why? I think it’s because it’s loaded with emotion. But many might argue it’s sex, even though not all romances have, or even allude to, sex.

However, while many romance readers like intimate scenes, sometimes kinky ones even, they don’t want them just for sex sake. If that was the case, they’d read erotica or watch porn. Good love scenes in romance aren’t just there for the titillation; they serve a purpose to the plot and character development. Love scenes shouldn’t be written as a play-by-play of a technical manual: Touch here, insert there.

After studying my favorite romance authors, I’ve learned that what makes a great love scene isn’t so much the mechanics, as much as it is the emotions and sensuality. Some of the best love scenes in books don’t mention body parts hardly at all, and yet, they’re sexy and sensual.

Today, when I write love scenes, I start with the frame of mind of the characters. Are they making up? Are they feeling sad and lonely? Are they playful? Are they needing connection? In Worth the Risk (free novella with my newsletter subscription or membership in my street team), Max and Madeleine have several love scenes. The first is about discovery and finally giving in to the attraction. The second reveals deeper feelings, and yet, a fear of sharing them. The reunion scene is all about connecting, filling the void at the loss they felt when they separated. So not only are their bodies touching, caressing etc, but their minds are at work as well. We can feel the longing and the desire, which increases the sensuality of the mechanics. At least that’s now I see it.

With the release of Fifty Shades of Gray, we’ve seen the popularity of highly explicit romances rise. Having read a few of these, I find my concept of a good love scene holds true. Yes these books show more and provide more diversity of positions and courser language, but ultimately, what makes them sexy and romantic is what’s going on in the characters’ heads and hearts, not just between their bodies.

What do you think? What aspects do you like best about a great love scene?